Baby Driver: a review

To get out of the heat today and spend some quality time together, my family and I decided to go to the movies. Baby Driver has been getting positive buzz, so when Judge John Hodgman gave it a big plug on his podcast this week, I just knew I had to see it.

Wow, this was a film that left 2 middle-aged adults and their teenaged daughters  grinning from ear-to-ear. This is a beautiful action-filled, tense heist movie with a sweet love story overlay. It is brutal in its gun violence and car chases. Yes , you read correctly, this is a film full of car chases that I really really love. The ingenuity of writer/director Edgar Wright is simply a marvel.

The main character, nick-named Baby (Ansel Elgort), is a getaway car driver who is constantly listening to music on his iPod. He is trapped in a life of crime, because of a stupid youthful bad decision and when he meets the girl of his dreams, he is determined to start a new chapter in his life. But then things get complicated, as they do, when a film also stars Kevin Spacey as a crime boss and Jon Hamm and Jamie Foxx as bank robbers.

I actually approached this film with some trepidation, despite all the positive reviews, because I didn’t want to get my hopes too high. I also have a serious allergy to most movie car chases, especially when it is “the same old, same old.” But I have a great love of Edgar Wright’s previous work. His knack for making me love films of genres I usually eschew is uncanny. He is also brilliant at comedy. If you need convincing of that fact, please watch the video below.

And then go watch Hot Fuzz or Shaun of the Dead or The World’s End.

Wright’s attention to detail and love of music is magnificently displayed on the big screen in Baby Driver. Throughout the film the audience is privy to Baby’s playlist and the beats are synchronized to the onscreen action in a remarkably joyful style. Full disclosure, I fully admit to being someone who loves her iPod Classic and will have it on at work as often as possible. Thus this movie spoke to my soul. For some of us, music is a very important part of a working day.

This is a tense drama that is peppered with comedic moments. The imaginative stunt driving, dazzlingly choreographed fights, vivid dimensional characters and sharp dialogue make for a fabulously original film. If you are looking for an excuse to see a movie that begs to be seen in the theatre, look no further.

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